Getting a Grip on Green Kyllinga

It’s tough growing turf in South Texas. Aside from the high heat, the soil is a heavy clay/sandy loam mixture that defies digging. “Up North you can stick a shovel into the soil, but down here you have to jump on it – and even then it may not move,” says George Cincotta, golf course superintendent at Riverbend Country Club in Sugar Land, Tex., just south of Houston. “In Texas we call it dirt, not soil.” Built in 1957 with Press Maxwell as architect, Riverbend underwent intensive renovation in recent years. Cincotta and his crew reshaped greens, converted fairway grasses, improved irrigation and replaced drainage. Currently, Riverbend features Mini Verde greens and 419 bermudagrass fairways, tees and roughs, with bits of fescue and seashore paspalum in the shady spots. Generally, Cincotta applies two preemergent weed applications – in spring and fall for warm-season and cool-season weeds. Last year, Cincotta had a problem with green kyllinga – a perennial sedge with narrow, grass-like leaves. “I hadn’t seen it for years and all of a sudden it popped up everywhere – even on tees,” adds Cincotta. “I knew it was time to change my spring preemergent treatment.” On the advice of his distributor representative, Cincotta applied Echelon® herbicide to all fairways and roughs – approximately 135 acres. “We sprayed Echelon in early March and I haven’t seen green kyllinga since,” says Cincotta. “It definitely controlled my kyllinga. I liked Echelon and will use it again next year.” Now that he has his tough weed problems under control, Cincotta has additional plans for enhancing his golf course, such as lengthening some holes...

Control Weeds in the Spring with a Fall Herbicide Application.

I saw this difficult-to-control sedge species—green kyllinga—invading the 9-hole, par 3 course at Alverthorpe Park in Abington, PA while golfing with my 6-year-old son, Tyler, on my birthday a couple of weeks ago. I consulted with Superintendent Tim Zurybida—better known as “Tim Z”—and this week he is putting out Dismiss® turf herbicide from FMC Professional Solutions as a fall weed control application. Kyllinga is fast becoming more common in managed turf. Unlike nutsedge, kyllinga uses rhizomes, underground overwintering vegetative reproductive structures that store nutrients for energy production for spring emergence. Fall applications of Dismiss will decrease rhizome viability and decrease the number of kyllinga shoots in the spring. This same type of activity also occurs with the control of nutsedge tubers. Fall is an optimum time for Dismiss applications. During the fall, sedges like most perennials are actively loading carbohydrates and other sugars into tubers to serve as energy necessary for emergence next spring. As nutrients and moisture are taken up by roots and delivered to tubers and rhizomes, Dismiss is transported in the nutrient flow into the tuber and rhizomes affecting viability and reducing sedge density next spring. On most cool-season turf types, a single application of 6 oz/acre rate of Dismiss is all you need, but if you have a dense population of kyllinga, a split application may provide better results. For bentgrass varieties, a single application of 4 oz/acre is labeled for control. Apply with at least 0.5 gallon of water volume with no surfactants required. Always read and follow label directions. Stay tuned to FMC Turf Wire for the AFTER photos from this week’s application...

Sulfentrazone: Turf protection that gets to the root of the problem.

FMC Professional Solutions proudly offers a comprehensive portfolio of weed, pest and turf disease management products, including a variety of herbicides containing an optimized amount of the active ingredient sulfentrazone. Sulfentrazone impacts underground weed reproductive structures, working to reduce future populations of weeds. Fewer weeds next season means a reduction in time, labor and chemical costs. Take a look at the difference. The photo on the left shows an area of turf covered with wild violet. The photo on the right shows the same area a whole season after treatment with an FMC product featuring sulfentrazone. As you can see, no wild violet has reemerged. With so many products packed with the power of this amazing active ingredient, you’re sure to find the right solution for your specific turf care needs. These products include: Blindside® herbicide: formulated for control of sedges and some of the toughest postemergence broadleaf weeds, like buttonweed, dollarweed and doveweed, in warm season turf — including St. Augustinegrass. Dismiss® turf herbicide: controls yellow nutsedge, purple nutsedge* and green kyllinga fast—with visible results appearing in just 24-48 hours. Dismiss® South herbicide: fast, visible results against yellow nutsedge and green kyllinga plus enhanced control of purple nutsedge in warm-season grasses. Dismiss® CA herbicide: all of the control of original Dismiss turf herbicide, labeled for use in California. Echelon® herbicide: delivers pre- and early postemergence control of crabgrass, sedges and goosegrass plus suppression of postemergence broadleaf weeds in a single application. Solitare® herbicide: specifically designed to combat any combination of postemergence crabgrass, sedges and broadleaf weed problems in a single application, no tank mixing required. Get long lasting...

May is the New June

Earlier this year, Dr. David Gardner of The Ohio State University warned professionals to get out with their preemergence herbicides by mid April. The unusually warm winter heralded a long, ugly weed season starting about 3 to 5 weeks early. If you didn’t follow Dr. Gardner’s advice (or even if you did), you might now be seeing some early sedge and goosegrass activity since these weeds germinate a little later than crabgrass. AGAIN, don’t wait until June—now is the time to follow up your first round preemergence application with a second round. Because it offers both pre- and early postemergence control against a variety of common spring weeds, FMC Professional Solutions recommends Echelon® herbicide for this follow-up treatment. In just a single treatment, dual action Echelon delivers: Preemergence crabgrass control Early postemergence crabgrass control (1-4 leaf stage) Preemergence nutsedge control Postemergence nutsedge control Preemergence goosegrass control Early postemergence goosegrass control (1-4 leaf stage) Postemergence suppression of labeled broadleaf...