Safety Share: Gators, Golf Courses and When to Let the Ball Go

Sometimes it’s best to let that golf ball go. I took this picture in Charleston, SC last year at a customer golf outing after my tee shot went a little far right. Instead of trying to recreate a scene from “Happy Gilmore” I chose to let this guy have my Top Flight. I was unaware that alligators lived that far north and if my partner had not pointed this out I would have likely walked up on him without noticing. This is a good example of why, when planning any trip, you should look over the local climate, forecast and, in this case, wildlife you may encounter. You should also keep a constant eye on your surroundings so as not to stumble into a dangerous situation. Looking for more safety tips? Check out our collection of FMC Safety Shares! If you like seeing interesting or unconventional happenings on the golf course, there are plenty more in our Turf In Focus...

Safety Tips to Prevent Slip and Fall Injuries

As we approach the end of winter, safety tips are still as important as ever. Taking the proper precautions can mean the difference between arriving to your destination safely and a slip and fall injury that could have been prevented. In the past 2 weeks, I have witnessed three separate slips/falls. While commuting to work, one person fell on the steps leading from the train platform up to Suburban Station, and another fell off the snowy/icy train steps as they were exiting the train. The person exiting the train was injured, and was assisted by fellow commuters. At home, I slipped on black ice when I was hurriedly carrying heavy garbage cans down our driveway in the dark. The way I worded that, you get the sense I now know what I was doing wrong. Below are some winter slip, trip, and fall safety tips from our friends at the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Slips and falls account for 300,000 serious injuries and 20,000 deaths a year. With winter and cold temperatures still lingering, it is important for you and your family to be aware of slip and fall prevention safety tips: Although your hands might be cold, don’t put them in your pockets when you are navigating wintry stretches. If you slip, you will need your arms to restore balance. If you fall, your arms will help you to break your fall and land safely. Wear the proper footwear. Although it may not be glamorous to wear a pair of boots, it will give you traction, not to mention keep your feet warm. If you want to wear...

The Responsible Care Global Charter Drives Globally Responsible and Safe Turf Care Product Production

A lot of what we do at FMC Professional Solutions involves a great deal of chemistry. We’re continuously researching new and innovative ways to create products that meet the growing needs for the turf care industry. Beyond that, we strive to implement safe production of chemicals as well as promote responsible product stewardship and sustainable development to the turf management community. Among other international companies, former FMC Corporation President and CEO William Walter put his signature on the Declaration of Support to the Responsible Care® Global Charter, one of the driving forces behind the globally responsible and safe production and distribution of our turf care products. Launched publically in 2006 at the International Conference on Chemicals Management (ICCM-1) by the International Council of Chemical Associations, the Responsible Care Global Charter focuses on improving performance, communication and accountability to the companies involved. Responsible Care is a major contribution to the industry in achieving sustainable development by committing companies to work together to continuously improve the health, safety and environmental performance of their products and processes. The Responsible Care Global Charter contains nine key elements and employs a system of checklists, performance indicators and verification procedures to guide the companies involved towards their global commitment. This initiative has driven a transformation in the way that companies operate: from being secretive and defensive about their activities, to being more open, honest and actively seeking dialogue and partnerships with stakeholders. Through Responsible Care, the industry can operate more safely, profitably and with care for future generations. The Declaration of support to the Responsible Care Global Charter requires the close co-operation of everyone involved...

Keep Your Hands Safe: Follow Lawn Mower Safety Tips

Lawn mower safety is essential knowledge that every turf professional should be equipped with. In this blog I will share statistics regarding lawn mower injuries and discuss how following these simple lawn mower safety tips from FMC Professional Solutions can help to prevent incidents. According to the ASSH, American Society for Surgery of the Hand, each year, more than 74,000 small children, adolescents and adults are injured by rotary, hand and riding power lawn mowers due to improper handling. First, let’s look at the kinetics of rotary power lawn mowers. Kinetic energy (motion) imparted by a standard rotary blade is comparable to the energy generated by dropping a 21-pound weight from a height of 100 feet which is equivalent to three times the muzzle energy of a .357 Magnum pistol. Blade speed can eject a piece of wire or object at speeds up to 100 miles per hour. Who’s getting injured? According to the ASSH, among injuries involving adults 25-64 years old and children under age five, 22% involve the wrist, hand or finger, 14% involve the foot, ankle or toes with 25% of all hand and foot injuries resulting in amputation. Deaths occurred in children under six years of age. Common Injury Patterns from Disregarding Lawn Mower Safety: Direct contact with rotating or jammed blade causing serious avulsion(tearing/separating) injuries to soft tissue and bones Gross contamination from contact with grass and soil harboring pathogens Injuries requiring multiple staged surgeries to cleanse wounds and provide soft tissue coverage (to regenerate healthy tissue/skin) Common Hazardous Weather Conditions for Mowing: Wet grass Damp ground Avoid These Scenarios to Ensure Lawn Mower...

Turf Professionals: Follow These Fire Safety Tips This Summer

As the weather warms up and the days get longer, one of my favorite things to do while at home is to start an outdoor fire in my backyard fire pit. After Hurricane Sandy last fall, I spent several hours (days if you ask my wife) hauling wood from a downed tree in my neighborhood and subsequently splitting it. It’s still not quite ready to burn, but I definitely have a good stockpile of wood for future backyard fire pit festivities. One of my family’s favorite things to do once the fire is good and ready is to roast marshmallows and eat s’mores. My boys like to try and roast (who am I kidding… burn) the marshmallows, but they would just as soon eat a raw marshmallow. So, for the spring and summer campers and other turf professionals who like to enjoy a backyard fire pit, please consider these important fire safety tips:   Never pour flammable fluids onto a flame or source of heat. The fluid can ignite and the flame can (and probably will) run right up the stream of fluid to ignite the container in your hand, with explosive and extremely harmful (if not fatal) results.     Never try to extinguish a grease fire with water. This was the last lesson learned by quite a few people cooking in their kitchen. Adding water to a grease fire results in a shockingly large fireball. You are not likely to survive the results of pouring water onto a pan full of burning grease over your campfire.     Never leave a fire unattended in any stage between...

Electrical Safety Tips for Kids During National Electrical Safety Month

Curiosity is a natural part of childhood learning, but it can be extremely dangerous when it comes to electricity. FMC, along with the Electrical Safety Foundation International, is dedicated to reducing the number of childhood injuries and deaths from electrically-related accidents through education and awareness. From game consoles to computers to cell phones, electricity is an increasing presence in our lives, and more electricity usage means more potential hazards. To effectively teach children about safe practices with electricity, it is imperative to teach them not only about electrical safety, but about electricity itself. The best way to keep children and older adults safe is to ensure we are taking steps to prevent electrical injury while at the same time making preparations to safely escape if there is an emergency. Please share the below electrical safety tips with your children: Plan a fire escape route and practice it with your children. Don’t allow children to play with electrical toys near water and make sure they know water and electricity DO NOT MIX! Never allow children to play with electrical cords, light switches or outlets. Never leave a child unsupervised while cooking or when a stove is within reach. Keep liquids and drinks away from electronics such as computers, video games and TVs as liquids could spill and cause shock or fire. Do not use space heaters in rooms where children are unsupervised and make sure the heater is at least three feet from any combustible. Never rest anything, like clothing or toys, on top of a lamp. Placing flammables near light bulbs is a fire hazard. For more information, visit...