Not all sedges are the same: annual vs. perennial sedge control.

We generally hear people talk about sedge control as one major topic, but not all sedges are the same. There are actually hundreds of different kinds of sedges and understanding the difference will help you correctly control them. Some products promote their control of “sedges”, but when you read the label, you realize they may only control one type of sedge. When thinking sedge control in turf, we can place sedges into two major groupings: annual and perennial. Annual sedge This grouping includes the only true annual sedge sometimes referred to as watergrass (Cyperus compressus ) and others like Texas sedge, globe, rice flathead and cylindrical sedge. Annual type sedges complete their life cycle from the spring through fall. They germinate primarily from seeds each year, mature in one growing season and die in less than 12 months. Annual sedges are more clumpy in appearance and emerge late in the season in wet, poorly drained areas. We tend to notice these sedges more as they begin to flower in the late summer and early fall. Once the first frost has occurred, these sedges are gone. Annual sedges are easier to control when compared to perennial sedges. Perennial sedge Perennial sedges, such as purple or yellow nutsedge, live more than one year and recover or regrow from dormant stolons, rhizomes, or tubers (nutlets) instead of seeds over a number of years. One yellow or purple nutsedge plant can produce hundreds of tubers in a season. These tubers can remain in the soil for long periods of time before they germinate to produce another sedge plant. Perennial sedges germinate or regrowth...

Master Pythium control in turf with these ten tips.

Pythium is a common and difficult disease to control across the board for turf and lawncare professionals. The soil borne pathogen poses a threat to both cool-season and warm-season turf and thrives in hot, humid weather. The disease can move quickly and aggressively, severely damaging large areas of turf in days or just hours if the conditions are right. Furthermore, the efforts to combat this disease once it hits are extremely costly. When Pythium is present, it’s crucial to take action as soon as possible, or the effects can be devastating to your turf. Prevention and control are very important things to consider when it comes to this aggressive disease. Read and follow these ten tips to help your turf stay disease free and recover quickly if Pythium happens to strike. Tips for Pythium prevention and control in turf: Provide adequate soil drainage to your turf and fill depressions where water stands. Be aware of how many gallons per acre your spray rig puts out. This can prevent over watering. Spike greens regularly to reduce thatch accumulation. Avoid saturating the soil of newly seeded areas. Establish a good turf nutrition program through the winter months to enhance root initiation and growth as well as aid the turf in disease resistance. Pythium can spread easily by animals, equipment and foot traffic. Delay mowing and limit traffic in problem areas until the surface is dry. Be vigilant for signs of disease during particular weather patterns and seasons; when evening temperatures average 65° F or higher, when dew begins to form in the early evening and remains until morning, and when late...