Rock Stars of Research were In the House!

We at FMC were thrilled to host some of the ‘Rock Stars of the Weed Research World’ recently at our FMC Innovation Center in Ewing, N.J. This two-day Researcher Roundtable was a first-time event for us – but it won’t be the last! Inviting some of the top weed researchers to tour our facility and provide input about what’s new in turf weed control was one way of getting closer to our customers – the end-users of FMC products. Much of the Roundtable was focused on maximizing the opportunity with Xonerate herbicide. By getting the researchers’ suggestions about what herbicides work best for which weeds in various areas of the country, we can better develop and formulate workable weed solutions for turf professionals. The Researcher Roundtable participants were: James Baird, University of California – Riverside Bruce Branham, University of Illinois Jim Brosnan, University of Tennessee Travis Gannon, North Carolina State University Steve McDonald, Consultant, Northeast & Mid-Atlantic Scott McElroy, Auburn University Jim Murphy, Rutgers University Tim Murphy, Consultant, Georgia Zac Reicher, University of Nebraska Fred Yelverton, North Carolina State University These top turf weed scientists work in the field on a daily basis, studying all aspects of weed control and conveying their results to turf managers in their respective regions. Their input is very important to us and key information as we work toward helping control and suppress weeds in the turf you manage. We appreciated their input!...

Why I Love the Golfdom Summit

We’re back from another year at the Golfdom Summit in Orlando, Fla. Whew! It was three days filled with great people, interesting presentations, engaging conversations and some tough golf …all at a fantastic facility — Reunion Resort. Each year, Golfdom magazine invites 50 qualified golf course superintendents to attend this event, as well as ten – 12 industry sponsors. The goal? Sharing information to help companies help the industry. Here are five things that keep FMC coming back, year after year: One-on-one meetings with knowledgeable golf course superintendents from throughout the country: Getting time to talk to them about what works and what doesn’t for their particular golf course is priceless! We take that information back to the company and use it to improve our existing products and create new solutions for our customers. World-class networking: There’s no better way to stay in touch with the industry than to be surrounded by industry professionals for a full three days. Talking to them, playing golf with them, sharing meals – all lead to a deeper understanding of how they maintain their facilities. Listening to the Pros: We gain knowledge from presentations by turfgrass management experts, such as Dr. Karl Dannenberger and Dr. Clark Throssell, not to mention Jim Rattigan, the Herb Graffis Businessperson of the Year winner. Rubbing elbows with other companies: Making new contacts and finding out what others are offering keeps us up-to-date and better able to provide relevant products and solutions. Golf, golf, golf: It’s all about the game, so getting out to play with other professionals makes it all more meaningful. Over the next several months,...

Get a Jump Start on 2015 with the FMC Early Order Program

Now, through December 12, you can purchase popular FMC products at current pricing but defer payment on select products until June 10, 2015 with the FMC Early Order Program. That’s huge! With more products and incentives than ever before, the FMC 2014 Early Order Program offers significant savings, a Build Your Own Bonus program and extended terms on its most popular turf and ornamental products. The program features an amazing early incentive that grants participants an additional rebate of 50% more than the base rebate for purchases of qualifying products from September 15 to October 31, 2014. The base rebate is still competitive in November and December, too. Popular FMC products included in the program are Dismiss®, Dismiss® South, Dismiss® CA, Blindside®, Echelon®, Solitare®, QuickSilver® and SquareOne® herbicides, Onyx®, OnyxPro®, Aria® and Talstar® insecticides; and — new this year — Disarm® fungicides, Triple Crown® insecticides and Xonerate® herbicide. In addition to the early incentive, participants are eligible for a new B.Y.O.B. — or Build Your Own Bonus — program this year. When participants purchase combinations of qualifying products from any two or all three FMC product lines (fungicides, herbicides or insecticides), they can multiply their entire base rebate by a corresponding percentage. To be eligible for the B.Y.O.B. Bonus, participants need only purchase a minimum of $500 of FMC herbicides or insecticides or $1,000 of FMC fungicides. For an example of the B.Y.O.B., if your base earned rebate falls between $200 and $999, you can earn an additional 5% of your entire base rebate if you purchased two product lines and 10% if you purchased all three product lines....

Jumping on the Pigment Bandwagon — Lower Costs and Better Weed Control

Tray Maltby used to overseed all three of his Florida golf courses wall-to-wall six months of the year. But now he’s rethinking that model. “Northerners want to play on green grass,” notes Maltby, director of golf course grounds at Reunion Resort near Orlando, Fla. “In central Florida, we can get a freeze and/or heavy frost where bermudagrass will go off-color, so we want to make sure it stays green.” Designed by legendary golfers Tom Watson, Jack Nicklaus and Arnold Palmer, the Reunion courses, like their creators, each have their own distinctive style. But they have at least one thing in common – their turfgrass varieties. They all feature Tifeagle bermudagrass greens, Tifdwarf bermuda collars and approaches and 419 bermuda on tees, fairways and roughs. Traditionally, Maltby planted perennial ryegrass on tees and fairways and Poa trivialis on greens, collars and approaches each October. “It costs roughly $40,000 to overseed all 90 acres of turf — and that’s just to get the seed here, before I’ve even opened a bag,” he explains. “When you add in fertilizer, herbicides, fuel costs and labor, it jumps up to more than $100,000.” Liquid Overseeding Trial With the advent of “liquid overseeding” — coloring the turf with pigments through winter months — Maltby feels he may have found a lower-cost solution to keeping his grass green, as well as accelerating his weed-control program. “We chose not to overseed the Nicklaus course greens this year and sprayed a few different pigment products as a trial instead,” he adds. “It’s turned out really well for us so far. For starters, it costs about one-third less than...

Triple Crown + Dispatch: A Mole Cricket Control Success Story

This blog was reposted with permission from Aquatrols. Mole crickets are a familiar foe for superintendents in the southeastern United States. While these pests like to feed on roots and leaves, the biggest threat to turfgrass stems from their extensive underground tunneling. Adult mole crickets create underground tunnels – sometimes up to three feet in length – that can sever roots and cause turf to protrude upwards. Damage at the surface often appears in the form of raised brown or bare patches. Superintendent John Ramsey is no stranger to mole crickets. He’s spent 13 years on the maintenance crew at Gulf Shores Golf Club in coastal Alabama and is now in his fourth season as the club’s superintendent. Ramsey knows the kind of havoc these pests can wreak if left unchecked. He and his crew made the decision to forgo pre-treatment for mole crickets early in the 2014 season. Ramsey instead chose to monitor mole cricket activity on his course and deal with the pests after their “fly-in” and mating period ended in early summer. Battling mole crickets after the mating season means timing an insecticide application perfectly. Adult mole crickets lay their eggs underground in late spring before eventually dying off. Young mole crickets in the nymph stage pose little threat to turfgrass. However, as they begin to mature, their tunneling behavior (and threat to turfgrass) increases exponentially. If an insecticide is applied too early, superintendents run the risk of missing out on eggs that have yet to hatch. Wait too long, however, and it becomes more difficult to eradicate mature mole crickets. Ramsey monitored the maturation process...