Cleaning Up Poa Annua on Collars and Surrounds

As the manager of four golf courses in Southport, N. C., Conrad Broussard, CGCS, always has his hands full. With two bentgrass courses and two bermudagrass courses, he has to cover all the bases in maintaining turf. One thing he no longer worries about is Poa annua on his ryegrass surrounds and collars. “Our older bentgrass course opened in 1991 and had a pretty good population of Poa annua,” says Broussard, Director of Agronomy at The Clubs at St. James Plantation. “They say a Poa seed bank can last up to 10 years or longer, so we were always looking for a way to control it.” Two years ago, Broussard participated in a trial with Xonerate® herbicide on his overseeded ryegrass approaches and fairways. He sprayed the new product twice in April at the rate of 2 oz. per acre. “On fairways, we applied a strip 20 feet wide — and came back again,” he notes. “You could see the line where there was no Poa. It really worked well and gave it a nice appearance. We had enough product to spray on collars and had really good success there, as well. Broussard liked Xonerate so well that he incorporated it into his regular program and has used it for the past two years. “It’s not an expensive program to clean up the surrounds,” he adds. “We were happy to find Xonerate — it’s a great product for Poa!”  ...

Putting Poa in Its Place

This article originally appeared in Sports Turf magazine, February 2015 issue – Ray Cipperly is proud of the baseball field he built with students and maintenance staff 40 years ago on the East Brunswick, N.J., campus of Middlesex County Vocational Schools. As a physical education teacher and baseball coach at the school, he wanted the students to have a better playing experience than they’d been having on the natural lay-of-the-land field behind the school. “We decided where the bases and home plate should be, cut it out with a sod-cutter and picked up all the rocks,” says the now District Athletic Director for five Middlesex Vocational high schools. “Everything went fine until we decided to renovate the field nine years ago.” Cipperly worked with nearby Rutgers University and numerous volunteers to tear out infield grass and foul territory, non-selectively control the outfield grass, re-grade and reseed with five different varieties of Kentucky bluegrass. The field established beautifully. “It looked like a sod farm… at first,” says Cipperly, who took short courses in turfgrass management at Rutgers, as well as assisting two Minor League New Jersey ballparks as head groundskeeper for several years. “Then we started seeing spots of light green grass coming in — Poa annua,” he continues. “We had gorgeous grass and then ugly green patches moved in. Apparently, Poa annua seed was in the soil and we disturbed it while re-grading the field.” An Eight-Year Battle For the past eight years, Cipperly has been battling the stubborn Poa annua, trying “everything under the sun” to eradicate the invasive grass. Head Groundskeeper Ryan Radcliffe joined him in the...