Turf In Focus: Winter Turf Management Recipe for Success

For this month’s Turf In Focus, we are featuring an image from Ken Lochridge of Glen Head Country Club in Glen Head, New York. As the temperatures drop, superintendents have to employ whatever winter turf management techniques they can to keep the grass alive. Ken’s winter turf management recipe for successfully thawing a golf course involves a little bit of sunshine, a dash of snow blower action and, voila, the turfgrass reappears! I’d say the snow blower and the sun did it’s job. pic.twitter.com/Bjn2mUTgFW — Ken (@kenlochridge) February 24, 2014 Stay tuned for more turf industry snapshots—if you have a photo as great as this photograph of winter turf management that you’d like to be featured on In Focus, please send it our way. On Twitter? Share your photo with @FMCturf or just add the #TurfInFocus hash tag to your tweeted photo! What is In Focus? As a turf care professional, you often come across interesting situations. Strange turf diseases. Huge fire ant mounds. And for some of you, even the occasional alligator. Many of you take pictures to document these encounters, and as true turf enthusiasts, we want to see them and share them with the world! That’s why FMC Turf Wire runs Turf In Focus, a monthly feature highlighting some of the most eye-catching photographs captured by turf care professionals on the...

Safety Share: Gators, Golf Courses and When to Let the Ball Go

Sometimes it’s best to let that golf ball go. I took this picture in Charleston, SC last year at a customer golf outing after my tee shot went a little far right. Instead of trying to recreate a scene from “Happy Gilmore” I chose to let this guy have my Top Flight. I was unaware that alligators lived that far north and if my partner had not pointed this out I would have likely walked up on him without noticing. This is a good example of why, when planning any trip, you should look over the local climate, forecast and, in this case, wildlife you may encounter. You should also keep a constant eye on your surroundings so as not to stumble into a dangerous situation. Looking for more safety tips? Check out our collection of FMC Safety Shares! If you like seeing interesting or unconventional happenings on the golf course, there are plenty more in our Turf In Focus...

Nutsedge Control in the Transition Zone

Clumps of nutsedge on manicured fescue golf course roughs are not a pretty sight at any time of year. But they are particularly unattractive in mid-August in the Transition Zone. "The fescue plant is just trying to make it through August without any interference," says Brent Rockwell, golf course superintendent at WingHaven Country Club in St. Louis, Mo. “When nutsedge gains a foothold and becomes well established at that time of year, it’s very difficult to control.” The last thing Rockwell wants to do is make a broadcast herbicide application in the searing heat of a Missouri August. But that’s what he had to do a few years ago, before he met Jay Young, FMC Market Specialist for the Midwest. Young suggested that Rockwell make a split application of Echelon® 4SC herbicide from FMC—one in the springtime and one in early summer. “We followed that protocol the last two years and Echelon gave us excellent control of nutsedge, as well as crabgrass and goosegrass,” he notes. “A split application of Echelon works great. Since it’s a combination product, you need to go out early for the preemergence control and then later for the postemergence action.” No one pays much attention to nutsedge until it gets out of control and then it’s too late, according to Rockwell. “You need to treat it proactively to get successful results,” he continues. “Once you get those big clumps out there, they are either too established to control with traditional rates or, if you do kill them, you’re left with big dead spots on your golf course! “Growing turf in the Transition Zone means...

2014 Golf Industry Show Highlights and ZOMBIE WEED WARRIOR Recap

Were you able to attend the 2014 Golf Industry Show? We had a great show this year. Check out the highlights in this short video: As you saw, ZOMBIE WEED WARRIORS stole the show at the 2014 Golf Industry Show! Offering interactive, tuber-slashing fun, the FMC Professional Solutions booth was thrilled to unveil our big surprise: An iPad game in which participants could compete for prizes and, of course, ZOMBIE WEED WARRIOR glory! The top scoring ZOMBIE WEED WARRIORS took home prizes and earned a spot on the prestigious leaderboard. Check out our top ZOMBIE WEED WARRIOR scorers in the overall leaderboard:Some of the highlights of the game included special “Meet and Beat” challenges where turf professionals could face-off against turfgrass celebrities and compete for prizes or play just for fun. Our celebrity competitors were from all walks of turfgrass life: from golf course superintendents to industry publication editors to university researchers. Participants had the opportunity to take home a ZOMBIE WEED WARRIOR t-shirt if they could top the turf celebrity’s score. It was great to see the enthusiasm from both the celebrities and our booth guests in becoming ZOMBIE WEED WARRIORS. We’d like to extend a special thank you to our celebrities: Tyler Otero of North Jersey Country Club, Larry Aylward of Superintendent magazine, Seth Jones of Golfdom magazine, Pat Jones of Golf Course Industry magazine and Dr. Jim Brosnan of the University of Tennessee. Thank you again for donating your valuable time to participating in our activities! We had a blast and we hope you did too. In the New Product Showcase, we featured our newest addition...

Safety Tips to Prevent Slip and Fall Injuries

As we approach the end of winter, safety tips are still as important as ever. Taking the proper precautions can mean the difference between arriving to your destination safely and a slip and fall injury that could have been prevented. In the past 2 weeks, I have witnessed three separate slips/falls. While commuting to work, one person fell on the steps leading from the train platform up to Suburban Station, and another fell off the snowy/icy train steps as they were exiting the train. The person exiting the train was injured, and was assisted by fellow commuters. At home, I slipped on black ice when I was hurriedly carrying heavy garbage cans down our driveway in the dark. The way I worded that, you get the sense I now know what I was doing wrong. Below are some winter slip, trip, and fall safety tips from our friends at the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Slips and falls account for 300,000 serious injuries and 20,000 deaths a year. With winter and cold temperatures still lingering, it is important for you and your family to be aware of slip and fall prevention safety tips: Although your hands might be cold, don’t put them in your pockets when you are navigating wintry stretches. If you slip, you will need your arms to restore balance. If you fall, your arms will help you to break your fall and land safely. Wear the proper footwear. Although it may not be glamorous to wear a pair of boots, it will give you traction, not to mention keep your feet warm. If you want to wear...