Control weeds after a new turf seeding with SquareOne® herbicide.

When done correctly, seeding and overseeding can establish thick, healthy turf able to better withstand invasive weeds and harmful turf pests. There are a few basic steps that are absolutely critical to a successful turf seeding project. Soil preparation: Prepping the soil is vital to improve germination. This can include loosening the soil’s surface, aerifying the soil and applying a starter fertilizer. When overseeding, thatch removal and mowing height must be considered. Seed coverage and contact: Uniform seed distribution is necessary to produce a thick, full stand of turf. Follow recommended seed rates and spread the seed evenly, making 2 to 4 passes in different directions. Proper irrigation: Water the newly seeded area with sufficient amounts to encourage germination and maintain growth. Control weeds: Carefully prepared soil is also ideal for weed population growth. You must implement a weed control strategy to prevent small broadleaf weeds and crabgrass from competing with your newly seeded turf. Choose your herbicide wisely — some products are too harsh for new seedlings, forcing professionals to wait weeks before applying. FMC Professional Solutions recommends SquareOne® herbicide to protect newly seeded turf from weed competition. Designed specifically for newly seeded turf, including interseeding and overseeding, the patent-pending, dispersible granule formulation features a dual action, optimized combination of active ingredients to control weeds such as crabgrass and many small broadleaf weeds. SquareOne can be used in both spring and fall turf renovation projects on lawns, athletic fields, sod farms and golf courses. Unlike other products that are too harsh on newly seeded turf or require multiple applications, SquareOne herbicide can be applied up to one day...

Ten safe workout tips for turf professionals.

Did you make a few New Year’s Resolutions at the start of the year? I did. The practice of New Year’s Resolutions dates back to the times of Julius Caesar! Today, it’s estimated that 45% of Americans usually make New Year’s Resolutions and this number jumps to 62% who occasionally make resolutions. A very popular resolution is to get active and be healthy! According to one study I found, losing weight was the number one most popular resolution and number five was staying fit and healthy. If you haven’t made this a resolution or if you’re having trouble keeping it, here’s a new reason to get you on track: your work performance. New research suggests that eating poorly and lack of exercise can affect how productive you are at work. The upcoming demands on turf professionals during the height of the in-season business and rigors of providing unbelievable service require optimal performance. The health benefits of being active far outweigh any risks. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t any risks. For an elite athlete, a weekend warrior, or anyone just starting out on a fitness plan, physical activity does increase the risk of injury, take it from me – a person who loves to exercise – injuries do occur. Don’t let that stop you from becoming more active, though. Whether you are starting a new exercise program, maintaining a regular routine or mixing it up, you’ll want to keep your workouts safe and effective. Take a look at these 10 tips for a safe workout according to the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans: Top 10 Tips for a Safe...

FMC Turf Wire Top Tweets

Check out the most popular @FMCturf tweets from the past two weeks, including turf pests and dollarweed control. Be sure to follow us on Twitter for turf care industry news, expert advice and the very latest turf product updates from FMC Professional Solutions. FMC Corporation Chairman and CEO Pierre Brondeau talks about the company’s future and growth strategy in @chemicalweek: ow.ly/hxVLi — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) February 11, 2013 Judging by the size of this cutworm, he’s been feasting well on @superin10dent’s greens: ow.ly/hL5Bd #TurfInFocus — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) February 16, 2013 Get a jump on #turf pests before they get a jump on you! Very informative blog post from @bugdoc_. ow.ly/hLiA9 — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) February 18, 2013 #Turf pros: take advantage of the valuable resources and tools we offer on our website:ow.ly/hGlIv — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) February 14, 2013 Video: a group of golfers sink nine simultaneous putts. Think you can top this? ow.ly/hOzcN — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) February 18, 2013 Match weeds with the right control options for your turf type using our Herbicide Solutions Finder: ow.ly/hGkuT — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) February 13, 2013 How to spruce up yardage markers: ow.ly/hLitZ Via @ct_turf — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) February 16, 2013 Read about how we proved to a skeptical superintendent how quickly Blindside herbicide controls dollarweed: ow.ly/hIwQE — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) February 15, 2013 FMC has donated some great items to the #GIS13 Silent Auction for @theeifg, like this warm-season product pack: ow.ly/hJfYE — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) February 15, 2013 Here’s how the Whitemarsh Valley CC grounds crew speeds up divot recovery on tees: ow.ly/hH3Zb — FMC Turf...

Turf In Focus: Cutworms Are Common Turf Pests on Golf Courses

Our latest edition of In Focus features a king-sized cutworm taken by Adam Garr, superintendent at Plum Hollow Country Club in Southfield, Michigan. Cutworms, common turf pests on golf courses, get their name by their feeding habits, literally cutting turfgrass down at the stem. For this particular cutworm, it was his lucky day because Adam decided to let him go as a sign of respect. To check out more about the daily happenings at Plum Hollow Country Club, check out the PHCC Greens Department Blog and follow them on Twitter @PHCCgreens. Might need to spray for cutworms already. If you can find a bigger one in Michigan in February I’d like to see it! twitter.com/Superin10dent/… — Adam Garr (@Superin10dent) February 11, 2013 Stay tuned for more great snapshots — and if you have a photo you’d like to be featured on In Focus, please send it our way. On Twitter? Share your photo with @FMCturf or just add the #TurfInFocus hash tag to your tweeted photo! We’re looking forward to seeing what kind of situations crop up! What is In Focus? As a turf care professional, you often come across interesting situations. Strange turf diseases. Huge fire ant mounds. And for some of you, even the occasional alligator. Many of you take pictures to document these encounters, and as true turf enthusiasts, we want to see them and share them with the world! That’s why FMC Turf Wire runs In Focus, a monthly feature highlighting some of the most eye-catching photographs captured by turf care professionals while on the...

Bright Ideas: dollarweed and nutsedge get smoked in this Blindside® herbicide review.

Nick Bright is the superintendent at Melrose Golf Club in Daufuskie Island, SC. When the Daufuskie Island resort that owned Nick Bright’s course went bankrupt, Nick and his crew kept the course open with no budget, no pro shop, some broken down equipment and often no electricity or running water. Dollarweed is a challenge for any superintendent, but on my course, right on the ocean, we had some plants as big as lily pads. When I told AJ Hephner, my local FMC Market Specialist about my dollarweed dilemma, he suggested I try Blindside® herbicide, a postemergence herbicide designed for warm-season turf, including St. Augustinegrass. In exchange, I would write a Blindside herbicide review. I was skeptical when he insisted I would see control within a week. But he was right: Blindside smoked the dollarweed fast. And even better, it took out the nutsedge as well. Blindside works on the leaves and the roots because it has both foliar and root uptake. This is important with dollarweed because 90 percent of the plant is underground. You want to get the whole thing; otherwise it will just come back next season. The other benefit of Blindside is that it works during the summer. Previously, I used a three-way on dollarweed but it only seemed to work well in the late fall and early spring, which is not when dollarweed is growing. Other products like atrazine can’t be used when the temperature is over 85 degrees. So it was great to spot spray some fairways and roughs in August and see results without damaging my Bermudagrass. It’s gone! Blindside herbicide smoked the...