FMC Turf Wire Top Tweets

Check out the most popular @FMCturf tweets from the past two weeks, including MSMA herbicide replacement options and herbicide selection made easy. Be sure to follow us on Twitter for turf care industry news, expert advice and the very latest turf product updates from FMC Professional Solutions. Cornell put a real lawn inside their library! Here’s why: ow.ly/ggSjQ — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) December 20, 2012 To cover, or not to cover your turf? Read@ct_turf’s latest blog post for his take on the subject: ow.ly/geWaJ — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) December 19, 2012 Turf pros: discover these MSMA herbicide replacement options: ow.ly/gi2JW — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) December 21, 2012 Snow days: what to consider when determining if an employee should be paid during severe weather. ow.ly/ghTUR Via @lawnlandscape — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) December 21, 2012 Herbicide product selection made easy: let our Herbicide Solutions Finder help you choose the right herbicide ow.ly/g77vj — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) December 17, 2012 Sulfentrazone – It’s like the Chuck Norris of active ingredients for nutsedge and kyllinga control. Find out why: ow.ly/gco83 — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) December 19, 2012 Does Your Golf Course Marshal Need A Little Help? ow.ly/gacUi Via @turfnetmedia — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) December 17, 2012 Meet Jason Mulcahy, our newest turf and ornamental Market Specialist in Florida: ow.ly/geSgq — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) December 20, 2012 3 winter lawn maintenance tips from @modern_turf: ow.ly/gcp7u #lawncare — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) December 18, 2012 Seth Jones of @golfdom talks to Rees Jones about what’s to come in 2013: ow.ly/gad4r #turfgrass #golf — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) December 17,...

MSMA herbicide replacements provide a variety of weed control options.

Weed control for residential and commercial lawn care got tougher when distributor sales of MSMA herbicide ended on Dec. 31, 2010. But several new and alternative products are replacing MSMA and filling in the gap. Lawn care professionals have used MSMA (Monosodium methanearsonate) since the 1960s to manage weeds such as crabgrass,goosegrass and nutsedge in warm-season turf. But the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ruled to discontinue sales at the end of 2010. Existing stocks of MSMA can legally be used for weed control on residential, commercial and sports field turf until they are exhausted, provided that these uses comply with the EPA-approved product label until December 31, 2013. But in the meantime, turf managers need to be considering new options for control of tough weeds in warm-season turf. Crabgrass Control: Research conducted at the University of Tennessee evaluated postemergence smooth crabgrass control with Drive® XLR8, Solitare® and Q4® herbicides at various stages of smooth crabgrass growth in 2010. All treatments at the 1-4 leaf stage provided greater than 90 percent smooth crabgrass control at 40 days after treatment. At the 1-2 tiller stage, all treatments provided greater than 88 percent smooth crabgrass control for 28 days after application. At the 3-5 tiller stage, smooth crabgrass control with the 1 lbai/A rate of Solitare exceeded 80 percent for 28 days while control with all other treatments was around 50 percent. Purple Nutsedge Control: Several new herbicides have recently been labeled for effective postemergence control of purple nutsedge in warm-season turfgrass species. Research conducted at the Texas Tech University in 2010 determined that Certainty® and Dismiss® South herbicides exhibited excellent purple...

Control nutsedge and kyllinga all season and beyond.

Achieving control of nutsedge and kyllinga has long been problematic for professional turf managers. However, herbicides containing the active ingredient sulfentrazone have proven to be very effective in providing not only fast results against these grassy weeds, but season-long control (when labeled rates are used). In addition, herbicides containing sulfentrazone also impact underground tubers (seeds), helping to reduce future generations of weeds. Herbicides like Echelon®, Dismiss®, Dismiss South®, Solitare® and Blindside® utilize sulfentrazone to provide both soil and foliar activity on nutsedges and kyllinga. Visible foliar activity can be observed just a few days after application due to rapid degeneration of cell walls from the inhibition of an enzyme called protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO). The inhibition of PPO blocks chlorophyll and heme synthesis, which disrupts photosynthesis. In one application, these sulfentrazone-containing herbicides control the above ground plant material and the underground reproductive structures of nutsedge and kyllinga plants for fast visible results and a reduction in long-term populations. Data collected from the FMC Research Farm in Sparks, GA (2009 to 2010) indicates that the number of new yellow nutsedge plants in areas treated the season before are significantly reduced when compared to non-treated areas. When sulfentrazone-containing herbicides are applied to an area for two seasons, a further reduction in nutsedge populations can be seen as shown below. For more information on how to control nutsedge and kyllinga with a sulfentrazone-containing herbicide or to find out which herbicide will best treat these grassy weeds on your turf, contact your Market...

FMC Turf Wire Top Tweets

Check out the most popular @FMCturf tweets from the past two weeks, including turf spreader calibration tips and a look at the turf professionals of Movember. Be sure to follow us on Twitter for turf care industry news, expert advice and the very latest turf product updates from FMC Professional Solutions. Thank you to all of the turf pros who shared their #Movember ‘staches with us. Here are their pictures: ow.ly/fOASf — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) December 4, 2012 Four simple calibration tips that will help you save time and money. ow.ly/g0Ca5#lawncare — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) December 11, 2012 Ever wonder what a garden gnome does all day? ow.ly/fUrsi #turfgrass — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) December 7, 2012 #Turfcare pros: not sure which herbicide to use on that weed? Give our Herbicide Solutions Finder a try. ow.ly/fSpeZ — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) December 6, 2012 Looking for some winter reading #turf pros? @lawnlandscape has a list of 100 books that should keep you occupied: ow.ly/fODqx — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) December 5, 2012 Automatically receive #turfgrass and #lawncare news, tips and more in a weekly email just like this. Sign up today! ow.ly/g2Bw3 — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) December 12, 2012 A big thank you to @grasshoppermowr for allowing us to use their amusing photo in this edition of #TurfInFocus. ow.ly/fUw5V — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) December 7, 2012 Seven reasons why people hate irrigation systems and seven tips to cure the anger. ow.ly/fIqaI Via @lawnlandsape — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) November 30, 2012 The STMA has announced its 2012 Field of the Year winners and Minor League Baseball Sports Turf Manager of the Year. ow.ly/g0AFG...

Holiday decoration safety guidelines for turf professionals.

The holidays are approaching and many turf professionals are beginning to decorate. Whether it be decorating your own home, your office or decorating customers’ homes, the finished decorations bring color, festivity and cheer, but the decorating process can expose you to many safety risks. The US Consumer Product Safety Commission has put together a holiday decoration safety guide to make your holiday safe by avoiding decorating related hazards. Trees: When purchasing an artificial tree, look for the label “Fire Resistant.” Although this label does not mean the tree won’t catch fire, it does indicate the tree will resist burning and should extinguish quickly. When purchasing a live tree, check for freshness. A fresh tree is green, needles are hard to pull from branches and do not break when bent between your fingers. The trunk butt of a fresh tree is sticky with resin, and when tapped on the ground, the tree should not lose many needles. When setting up a tree at home, place it away from fireplaces and radiators. Because heated rooms dry live trees out rapidly, be sure to keep the stand filled with water. Place the tree out of the way of traffic and do not block doorways. Lights: Indoors or outdoors, only use lights that have been tested for safety by a recognized testing laboratory, which indicates conformance with safety standards. Only use lights that have fused plugs. Check each set of lights, new or old, for broken or cracked sockets, frayed or bare wires, or loose connections, and throw out damaged sets. Always replace burned-out bulbs promptly with the same wattage bulbs. Use no...