The Value of University Field Days.

Greetings! It’s official: school is back in session, the football season is in full swing and another summer is in the books. While Summer may be officially over, the Summer-like weather conditions are still holding on strong in many parts of the Midwest. The excitement of the early Spring was quickly replaced with concern. The drought and extreme heat have been the dominant topics of conversation when visiting with customers, and at many of the Field Day events I attended this summer. There is a lot of time and effort put into running a successful University Field Day. This year, it seemed as if many Universities went out of their way to make sure attendees were well cared for. There was plenty of water to drink, and some even set up shade tents at each stop on the tour to help out with the extreme heat. From the University personnel and volunteers that help set up the event, down to research personnel and manufacturer representatives who spend countless hours applying products and gathering data, a lot of time and resources are expended to make sure the most accurate information is presented to those who attend. Unfortunately, a recent trend at these University Field Days is dwindling attendance. A wealth of information can be obtained at these events. Information you may not always be able to gather via text message, the internet or message boards. New products are on display, new uses for older products are demonstrated, and you can gain a better sense of the current, overall state of the industry just by listening to others speak about their...

Control Weeds in the Spring with a Fall Herbicide Application.

I saw this difficult-to-control sedge species—green kyllinga—invading the 9-hole, par 3 course at Alverthorpe Park in Abington, PA while golfing with my 6-year-old son, Tyler, on my birthday a couple of weeks ago. I consulted with Superintendent Tim Zurybida—better known as “Tim Z”—and this week he is putting out Dismiss® turf herbicide from FMC Professional Solutions as a fall weed control application. Kyllinga is fast becoming more common in managed turf. Unlike nutsedge, kyllinga uses rhizomes, underground overwintering vegetative reproductive structures that store nutrients for energy production for spring emergence. Fall applications of Dismiss will decrease rhizome viability and decrease the number of kyllinga shoots in the spring. This same type of activity also occurs with the control of nutsedge tubers. Fall is an optimum time for Dismiss applications. During the fall, sedges like most perennials are actively loading carbohydrates and other sugars into tubers to serve as energy necessary for emergence next spring. As nutrients and moisture are taken up by roots and delivered to tubers and rhizomes, Dismiss is transported in the nutrient flow into the tuber and rhizomes affecting viability and reducing sedge density next spring. On most cool-season turf types, a single application of 6 oz/acre rate of Dismiss is all you need, but if you have a dense population of kyllinga, a split application may provide better results. For bentgrass varieties, a single application of 4 oz/acre is labeled for control. Apply with at least 0.5 gallon of water volume with no surfactants required. Always read and follow label directions. Stay tuned to FMC Turf Wire for the AFTER photos from this week’s application...

Pesticide safety tip: handling for transportation, storage and spills.

Pesticides are powerful substances that must be transferred carefully in order to ensure overall safety. Follow these pesticide safety tips whenever you handle or transport pesticides: Pesticides should be kept in a locked storage container during transport. Absorbent materials such as sand should be kept on hand in case of a spill, along with a shovel, broom and bag. In the event of a spill, avoid contact with the pesticide and keep unprotected persons away from the affected area. Then, follow the instructions provided on the pesticide product label. Want more Applied Knowledge from FMC? Additional tips on safe and responsible pesticide use are available in the FMC Stewardship Brochure. What safety precautions surrounding pesticides do you take on a day-to-day basis? Does your company have pesticide storage or spill protocols? Leave a comment below and let us...

FMC Turf Wire Top Tweets

Check out the most popular @FMCturf tweets from the past two weeks, including a golf course dog up to her shoulders in mud. Be sure to follow us on Twitter for turf care industry news, expert advice and the very latest turf product updates from FMC Professional Solutions. New Blog: This #TurfInFocus photo features Weller, a dog up to her shoulders in turf mud. ow.ly/dIK1v — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) September 16, 2012 It’s time for fall turf renovation projects. Here’s how to give new #turfgrass the best possible start. ow.ly/dRhLd — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) September 20, 2012 Herbicide failure does happen—here are the three main reasons why: ow.ly/dRKc7 — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) September 20, 2012 Find out why the odd weather has made it difficult for East Lake Golf Club to prepare for the TOUR Championship: ow.ly/dS6Fg — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) September 21, 2012 A week’s worth of professional #turfcare topics sent right to your inbox! Sign up here: ow.ly/dQbtJ — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) September 19, 2012 Our Herbicide Solutions Finder will help you select the proper herbicide for your weed problem. ow.ly/dHiXa — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) September 13, 2012 Cincinnati-based @oasisturf owner talks about what’s made his business successful. ow.ly/dBcrA — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) September 10, 2012 Find out how this super saved a lot of money on what he thought was a fungus or nematodes on his #turfgrass. ow.ly/dNLD0 — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) September 19, 2012 We have over 100 links to some great #turfgrass related blogs featured on our blogroll. Check them out: ow.ly/dFzJl — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) September 13, 2012 GPS Insight announces a new...

Featured Pests – Wasps and Hornets.

Wasps and hornets are arguably one of the most feared pests among people. In addition to their painful stings, these insects are equipped with venom that causes serious allergic reactions in an estimated one to two million people in the United States. In some cases, these reactions can be fatal. Both species are dangerous and unpredictable, however hornets have been known to be more aggressive than wasps. Hornets will often sting without much provocation, while wasps will sting if they feel threatened or if their nests are disturbed. Because of this aggressive behavior, hornet and wasp problems often cause customers serious concern and distress. Due to their physical similarities, people often confuse wasps and hornets. The bald-faced hornet, most common in North America, is identified by its black and ivory white markings. The paper wasp is known to display dusty yellow to dark brown or black markings. Despite their visual similarities, their nests are unique in size, shape and location. Wasps tend to build their umbrella-shaped nests in protected spaces, such as attics, soil cavities and eaves. Hornet nests, on the other hand, tend to be larger, pear shaped and can be seen hanging from tree branches as well as eaves. Both adult species are predators and hunt other small insects. They are also attracted to sweet nectars and can often be found near fruit, flowers and on the sap of oak trees. Sweet food left outside by humans will also attract them, which is why they can sometimes become a nuisance at outdoor gatherings where food is near. For fast elimination and residual control of these menacing pests,...