FMC Turf Wire Top Tweets

Check out the most popular @FMCturf tweets from the past two weeks, including a warm-season turf plan to combat broadleaf weeds and sedges. Be sure to follow us on Twitter for turf care industry news, expert advice and the very latest turf product updates from FMC Professional Solutions. One simple adage explains how #turf pros should handle the unusual weather we’ve seen in 2012. ow.ly/bTkFV — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) June 28, 2012 A mild winter and calm spring have forced #turf pros to prepare for just about anything. ow.ly/bTl2h — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) June 29, 2012 Warm-season #turfgrass pros: do you have a battle plan for tough broadleaf weeds and sedges? ow.ly/bEoMz — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) June 18, 2012 Here are some tips to help keep America’s favorite pastime safe for kids. ow.ly/bJFzs — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) June 21, 2012 Dr. Pete Teel, a Texas AgriLife Research entomologist, explains the new TickApp for smartphones: ow.ly/bJXYO #pestcontrol — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) June 22, 2012 Wimbledon’s Guardians of Grass Face a Challenging Summer: ow.ly/bQaoV #Turfgrass — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) June 26, 2012 Dr. Aaron Patton from @BoilermakerTurf shares tips for applying herbicides in a drought. ow.ly/bJXcy Via @TurfMagazine — FMC Turf (@FMCturf) June 21,...

From mild to wild, unusual weather forces turf pros to expect the unexpected.

As the Turf and Ornamental Market Specialist for FMC Professional Solutions in the Southeast region, I’ve witnessed firsthand a very strange 2012 thus far. The year began with one of the mildest, shortest winters I can remember. Now we are in the midst of one of the calmest and longest springs in recent memory. What’s more, over the past few years the Deep South has become accustomed to multiple snowfalls in January and February, followed by a brief spring and then tortuous summer heat! Although mild overall temperatures may seem desirable, they can present a catch-22 of sorts. At this point, golf course superintendents who maintain bentgrass greens are happy that we’re still experiencing 77° F days with a mild breeze to boot. Their turf is healthy, their root systems are still intact and their fungicide usage is down. But what about the ultra-dwarf Bermuda courses? Bermudagrass needs warm days and nights to thrive along with plenty of sunlight. Unfortunately for these superintendents, the mild days accompanied by overcast skies prevent precious sunlight from reaching their Bermuda greens. Despite the money I saved from my home’s gas heater staying dormant for most of January and February, Old Man Winter still plays a vital role in our ecosystem. Cold weather helps maintain pest populations and keeps spring and summer weeds at bay. Whether you typically deal with aphids, mosquitoes, army worms, fire ants or beetles, insect populations are expected to grow this year due to the mild winter we recently experienced. This affects LCO, golf and nursery budgets as more insecticides have to be sprayed. The same is happening with...

Why You Should Only Use Registered and Authorized Pesticides

Using registered and authorized pesticides from an authorized supplier or distributor enables you to do your job effectively, maintain pesticide safety and stay in good standing with the law. It also helps eliminate the potential for human and environmental harm associated with illegal or unauthorized products. The Environmental Protection Agency requires registration applicants to submit more than 100 separate scientific studies and tests. Only pesticides that “meet the highest standards of safety to protect human health and the environment” receive EPA approval. Choosing only registered and authorized pesticides and carefully following label directions is essential to protecting your customers and the planet. Want more Applied Knowledge from FMC? Additional tips on safe and responsible pesticide use are available in our latest Stewardship...

The Wee One Foundation is a big help to superintendents in need.

In 1985, Wayne Otto and three friends were in Scotland on a golf trip. As the men were preparing to tee off, their caddies placed bets. “My money’s on the wee one!” one shouted. He was talking about Wayne. It was a nickname that would stick with Otto for the rest of his life. Wayne Otto spent more than three decades as a Certified Golf Course Superintendent at the Ozaukee Country Club in Mequon, Wisconsin. His quotable nature, infectious humor and extraordinary work ethic made Otto countless friends over the years, many of whom joined together to support him when he was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Shortly after his passing in 2004, those who had aided Wayne in his battle with cancer established the Wee One Foundation to pay tribute to his legacy. The Wee One Foundation assists golf course management professionals and their families experiencing financial hardship due to overwhelming medical expenses. To date, the foundation and its more than 270 members have provided over $500,000 in assistance to beneficiaries in nearly a dozen states. As a part of the Solitare Summer Rebate program – going on now through August 15, 2012 – turf professionals have the option to let FMC Professional Solutions make a donation to the Wee One Foundation on their behalf for every case of Solitare® herbicide purchased. Support the Wee One Foundation, defend your turf against crabgrass, sedges and broadleaf weeds and save BIG – all at the same time! Contact your FMC Market Specialist or local FMC Distributor today. • For additional details on the Solitare promotion, click here. • Click here to...

Playing it safe this season.

Summer isn’t summer without America’s favorite pastime: baseball. FMC Professional Solutions is dedicated to keeping athletic turf beautiful and pest-free, but we also care about protecting the most important thing on the ball field: the team! According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, nearly 110,000 baseball and softball-related injuries were treated in emergency rooms nationwide among children ages 5 to 14 in 2007 alone. Children between the ages of 11 and 14 accounted for the biggest proportion of these injuries. Typical injuries include shoulder and elbow injuries (particularly for pitchers), foot and ankle injuries, eye and facial injuries and concussions. In a report for the American Academy of Pediatrics, Dr. Joseph Congeni from the Akron Children’s Hospital identifies important ways to prevent injury on the ball field. Dr. Congeni’s recommendations include: • Players should always wear appropriate protective gear. Batters should wear batting helmets with face protection, such as polycarbonate eye protection or metal cages. Catchers should wear helmets, masks with throat guards and chest protectors. Male players should wear hard plastic athletic cups and all players should wear shoes with rubber-spiked soles. • Because a direct ball impact to the chest could cause cardiac arrest, particularly in children ages 5 to 14, all coaches should be prepared to call 911 and have rapid access to an automated external defibrillator. • Extreme weather conditions like high heat or lightning put players at risk. Postpone or cancel games if weather conditions threaten the health of players. • Because not all children develop at the same pace, parents and coaches must recognize that repeated instruction and practice are essential for young...